These ties go back to the time of George Washington. That’s more than two hundred years ago! And you’ll be amazed to find out the truth.

Background information about George Washington

George Washington was born to Augustine and Mary on February 22, 1732 in in Westmoreland County, Virginia. The Washington family were moderately prosperous members of the Virginia gentry, of “middling rank.”  When George was about 11 years old, his father died of a sudden illness. As a result, George’s half-brother Lawrence became a surrogate father to him.

George didn’t get the same education as his siblings, due to his father’s early death. His half-brother Lawrence was Adjutant General of Virginia. When Lawrence died in 1752, the district was divided into four regions. The governor appointed George as a district adjutant of one of the four areas.

George Washington and Presidency

After a long military and political career, George Washington was elected President. He served as president from 1789 – 1797. The first United States Congress voted to pay him a salary of $25,000 a year. Today, that would be about $300,000.

Washington retired in 1797 and returned to his plantation and personal business interests. However, his private lifestyle did not last long. By 1798, relations with France deteriorated and war was imminent. President Adams asked Washington to return and offered him the position of commander in chief of the armies for a potential war. Yet France did not invade. Washington did not have a field command.

On December 12, 1799, Washington spent considerable time outdoors in snow and freezing rain. He developed a sore throat. A few days later he awoke with severe breathing difficulties. He was barely able to speak or swallow. Doctors rushed over and performed “bloodletting,” a standard medical practice of the time. One of the doctors realized that the treatment wasn’t working. He suggested performing an emergency tracheotomy, however many doctors were unfamiliar with the procedure and the other doctors present advised against it. Washington did not recover and died on December 14, 1799 at 67 years old.