Tomer Dudai, a famous Israeli illusionist, will leave you in awe. His magic tricks seem impossible. Yet the well known expression goes, ‘seeing is believing’. This man is the real deal!

Israel’s Got Talent

Tomer begins by showing the judges that taking off his gloves and proving he doesn’t have anything hidden in his hands. Yet when he tosses the gloves into the air, they suddenly morph into a paper airplane and zoom off! This sets the stage for the next trick – a woman, whose top part of her body is invisible, walks on stage pushing a cart! Tomer, the illusionist, then does some fancy work with disappearing handkerchiefs.

The illusionist sits down

This may sound simple. But take a closer look, and you’ll realize that something is very wrong. Tomer is sitting down, and even reclining, but without using any apparent support! How does he do it?! The judges are totally stunned. Then the magician leans back with no support. Are there hidden cables supporting him? Perhaps a narrow translucent pole underneath? Nobody could figure that one out. There are no visible cables, and no visible supports underneath.

Tomer then hops of the stage and thanks the crowd. He is just so grateful to be able to perform at Israel’s Got Talent. Magicians, illusionists, and mentalists have for a long time been entertaining audiences. But Tomer is not the first Jewish person to practice in front of an audience. There are other magicians with connections to Judaism. To name a few, some come to mind – David Blaine, David Copperfield, Uri Geller, and of course, Harry Houdini.

Harry Houdini was born to a Jewish family in Budapest. He was known for his escape acts. Harry and his family arrived in the United States in 1878. Harry Houdini began his magic career in 1891. This launched many shows. As well, he public became enthralled with magic shows, leading up to modern-day fascination.