The Jewish wedding is one of the most emotional and happy times ever.

The Jewish wedding

This is one of the most emotional and happy times ever. First, the groom goes to the bride and lifts up her veil and looks in her eyes. He then walks to the wedding canopy, called a “chuppah” in Hebrew. After he goes, then the bride goes to the chuppah and walks around him seven times. The rabbi leads the ceremony. They recite blessings for the new couple. The groom places a ring on the bride’s finger.

Tears of joy and sadness

Opposite to the extreme joy is sadness. This is because we know that as much as we want to celebrate, the Jewish people is not complete as long as the Temple is destroyed. A hole still remains in our hearts. It would be wrong of us to party without recalling that our sacred Temple has been destroyed. Therefore, the groom breaks a glass (usually by stepping on it) to recall the broken Temple. Along with that, they sing “im eshkachech” or “if I forget thee, oh Jerusalem…”.

The Ketubah

This document states the responsibilities of the husband to his wife. Consequently, he has to provide for her. The Ketubah protects the woman in a Jewish marriage. Many people have the ketubah designed artistically, with creative colors and pictures. Hence, it is a like a piece of artwork and they proudly display the ketubah. Then comes the celebrations. Family and friends dance with the bride and groom. They eat together, and recite special blessings afterwards, called the sheva brachot. These meals continue for the next seven days, assuming that there are new people at the meal who did not take part in the wedding or a previous meal. Everyone is very happy for the bride and groom, who by now are starting their new lives together.