Out of 1,100 Syrian refugees brought to Britain this year, none of them were Christian refugees. Something is very wrong.

Big Problem

Yes, Syrian Muslims persecute fellow Muslims. However, so have non-Muslim minorities like the Christians and the Yazidis. They are persecuted even more because they have no place to run in the Muslim filled Middle East. Sunni Muslims persecuted by Shiite Muslims, can run to Sunni enclaves. Shiite Muslims can run to Shiite enclaves. But the Christian refugees, Yazidi refugees and other minorities suffered from all of the different Muslim groups. And they had nowhere to run to.

Yet, the UK, and the United Nations Human Rights Council prioritized Muslim refugees over the Christian refugees and Yazidi refugees.

United Nations

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recommended that the UK take in 1,358 Syrian refugees for resettlement. Only four of those refugees were Christians (no Yazidis were recommended). Yet the British Home Office only accepted to resettle 1,112 of Muslim refugees and refused to accept the Christians.

Lord David Alton

Lord David Alton of Liverpool is a life peer in the House of Lords. He recently wrote in a letter to the British Home Secretary Sajid Javid:

“There is widespread belief, justified or not, among the religious minorities of Syria that the UNHCR is biased against them. The UK has a legal obligation to ensure it does not turn a blind eye to either direct or indirect perceived discrimination by the UN.”

“It is widely accepted that Christians, who constituted around 10 per cent of Syria’s pre-war population, were specifically targeted by jihadi rebels and continue to be at risk.”

A Clear Pattern

“…As last year’s statistics more than amply demonstrate, this is not a statistical blip. It shows a pattern of discrimination that the Government has a legal duty to take concrete steps to address.”

In light of these facts, it would certainly appear, as Lord Alton states in his letter, that the UK has indeed been “turning a blind eye” to the plight of Christian (and Yazidi) refugees for several years.

Prime Minister Theresa May

British Prime Minister May mentioned in Parliament on July 18 that the British government stands with the persecuted Christians all over the world. Yet actually saving is a more powerful statement than mere lip service.

“As a Government, we stand with persecuted Christians all over the world and will continue to support them. It is hard to comprehend that today we still see people being attacked and murdered because of their Christianity.  But we must reaffirm our determination to stand up for the freedom of people of all religions and beliefs.  And for them to be able to practice their beliefs in peace and security.”

Christian refugees are still looking for assistance from the Western world, more interested in bringing in Muslim refugees, even though there are plenty of Muslim countries in the Middle East that can take them in.