Do you know why Jews eat matzoh on Passover? This entertaining video and explanation below gives you everything you need to give you a craving for that delicious Passover food.

Passover: Holiday of Freedom

Passover is the holiday of freedom. It commemorates when God took the Jews out of Egyptian slavery, enabling them to practice Judaism. But it wasn’t an easy journey. Pharaoh was stubborn and didn’t let Israel leave. Moses, God’s messenger, was sent to lead the Jewish nation. God sent the ten plagues to Egypt and punished the Egyptians.

The Ten Plagues

First there was blood. All the water in the river turned to blood. This killed all the fish and the Egyptians had no water to drink. Afterwards came the plague of frogs. Frogs appeared everywhere, making loud and horrible noises. Then came lice. After the lice, the next plague was wild beasts. The next plague was cattle disease. Afterwards God punished the Egyptians with painful boils. Then came hail. This was no normal hail, however the large balls of ice contained within them fire. The hail came smashing down, destroying Egyptian property and crops. Locusts were the next plague, and they devoured whatever Egyptian crops remained. After the locusts came the plague of darkness. For days, the Egyptians sat in total darkness, unable to move. Meanwhile, the Jews were able to see. Finally, there came the last plague – the death of every Egyptian firstborn.

Exodus and Matzoh

After the final plague, Pharaoh finally had enough and allowed the Jews to leave Egypt. The Jewish people had to leave quickly, and didn’t have time to make proper provisions. As a result, their bread didn’t rise. It was flat bread, or what is know today as ‘matzoh.’ Matzoh represent the bread of our salvation. It is the traditional food eaten on Passover. Similar to the original matzoh, our matzoh is prepared very quickly. As this video shows, there are a lot of steps involved. First, the flour is mixed with water. Then the ingredients are kneaded into a dough. The dough get dived into sections, and is then distributed to other bakers. Each baker works the dough, creating a circle-like shape. It is placed in the oven and then loaded into stacks.