Purim on wheels. No other Jewish Holiday has crazy customs like the Jewish Holiday of Purim.  But, these guys take the public celebration of the Holiday to a whole new level.

The celebration of Purim is one of the oddest Jewish customs to non-observant Jews.  What could possibly justify silly-looking celebrations that include considerable amount of alcohol?  Is this really a religious act?  Is this perhaps a negative Jewish Holiday?  The answer is: Of course it is a positive Jewish Holiday. All Jewish Holidays are positive.  However, Purim is just a uniquely celebrated Jewish Holiday.

The story in a nutshell

Around 2,000 years ago, the Persian Empire dominated the world.  King Ahasverosh of Persia, was looking to please as many people as possible in his wealthy kingdom.  The main tactics he used were wine, food, and song.  But, he had one minister who had villainous plans.  The minister’s name was Haman. He schemed to destroy the entire Jewish race – much like Hitler and the Nazis aspired to.  Haman actually received approval from the King to carry out his plans and even set dates to implement.

Obviously, the Jewish people went into a frantic state.  Mass prayer services became the norm and repentance dominated Jewish streets.  Surprisingly, the amazing salvation actually came from inside the King’s palace.

The newly appointed Queen, Esther, gathered up the gumption, with advice from her relative, Mordechai, and confronted the King about Haman’s plans.

Queen Esther’s timing was perfect.  Her tactics were brilliant, and the King made a 180 turn and decided to kill Haman – on the spot.  In addition, the Jewish people were saved in a miraculous turnaround.  The day that was set to be a day of destruction transformed to a day of salvation from the enemies of the Jews.

The Celebration

A central message of the Purim holiday is the hidden hand of God in all that happens in the world.  The Jewish people repeat and celebrate this concept over and over on Purim.

But why drink?  First off, drinking recalls the wine and song in Persia.  But, more importantly, when we drink, we go beyond our normal limits and enter different realms of mindset.

If we know how to drink and not act foolishly, but drink and focus on the hidden Godliness in the world we live in, then celebrating like this can actually be a spiritual exercise.

Purim on wheels is witty, kind of silly, but totally in the spirit of publicizing the great miracle of God’s salvation.